Topic 2: National Transportation Communications for Intelligent Transport System Protocol



1. Read and translate the text:

The National Transportation Communications for Intelligent Transport System Protocol (NTCIP) is a family of standards designed to achieve interoperability and interchangeability between computers and electronic traffic control equipment from different manufacturers.

The protocol is the product of a joint standardization project guided by the Joint Committee on the NTCIP, which is composed of six representatives each from the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA), the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), and the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE).

The project receives funding under a contract with the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) and is part of a wider effort to develop a comprehensive family of Intelligent Transport System (ITS) standards.

NEMA initiated the development of the NTCIP in 1992. In early 1993, the US Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) brought together transportation industry representatives to discuss obstacles to installing field equipment for new Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). The key objectives of the new NTCIP protocol were the interchangeability of similar roadside devices, and the interoperability of different types of devices on the same communications channel.

NTCIP standards offer increased flexibility and choices for agencies operating transportation management systems. According to the NTCIP Guide, use and application of the NTCIP provides the following benefits to Intelligent Transport System (ITS) deplores:

  • Avoiding Early Obsolescence;
  •  Providing a Choice of Vendor;
  • Phased Procurement and Deployment;

· Enabling Interagency Coordination;

  • Use One Communications Network for All Purposes.

NTCIP allows agencies to exchange information and (with authorization) basic commands that enable any agency to monitor conditions in other agencies’ systems, and to implement coordinated responses to incidents and other changes in field conditions when needed. Such data exchange and coordinated response can be implemented either manually or automatically. One agency can monitor, and issue basic commands, if authorized, to field devices operated by another agency, even though those devices may be from a different vendor than those used by the monitoring agency. Potential applications of interagency coordination include:

    •  Coordinating timed transfers at a shared transit center,
    • Coordinating traffic signals across jurisdictional boundaries,
    • Providing traffic signal priority for selected, e.g., behind schedule, transit vehicles,
    • Providing real-time information to a shared traveler information center,
    • Monitoring traffic volumes on another agency’s roadway,
    • Coordinating the operation of a freeway ramp meter with an adjacent traffic signal, or posting a warning message on another agency’s dynamic message sign.

NTCIP allows a management system to communicate with a mixture of device types on the same communications channel. The NTCIP Framework is based primarily on the open standards of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and ISO, plus NTCIP data dictionary standards specific for the task of ITS device communications. A layered, or modular, approach to communications standards, is used to represent data communications between two computers or other electronic devices.

To ensure a working system, deplorers should select and specify at least one NTCIP protocol or profile at each level. A discussion of each level, and NTCIP standards that apply at that level, follows:

  • NTCIP Information Level — Information standards define the meaning of data and messages and generally deal with ITS information (rather than information about the communications network). Information level standards represent the functionality of the system to be implemented.
  • NTCIP Application Level — Application standards define the rules and procedures for exchanging information data.
  • NTCIP Transport Level — Transport standards define the rules and procedures for exchanging the Application data between point 'A' and point 'X' on a network, including any necessary routing, message disassembly/re-assembly and network management functions.
  • NTCIP Subnetwork Level — Subnetwork standards define the rules and procedures for exchanging data between two 'adjacent' devices over some communications media.

· NTCIP Plant Level — The Plant Level is shown in the NTCIP Framework only as a means of providing a point of reference to those learning about NTCIP.

2. Find Russian equivalents for:

- Key objectives

- Choice of Vendor

- Early Obsolescence

- Traffic volumes

- Real-time information

3. Say whether the given sentences true or false. Correct if necessary:

  • NTCIP Information Level — Information standards define the meaning of wrong data and messages and generally deal with ITS information (rather than information about the communications network). Information level standards represent the functionality of the system to be implemented.
  • NTCIP Application Level — Application standards define the rules and procedures for exchanging information data.
  • NTCIP Transport Level — Transport standards define the absence of rules and procedures for exchanging the Application data between point 'A' and point 'X' on a network, including any necessary routing, message disassembly/re-assembly and network management functions.
  • NTCIP Subnetwork Level — Subnetwork standards define the rules and procedures for exchanging data between two 'adjacent' devices over some communications media.

· NTCIP Plant Level — The Plant Level is shown in the NTCIP Framework not only as a means of providing a point of reference to those learning about NTCIP but as a way of solving a lot of problems.


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