Put the sentences in the right order. 1) So he pocketed five guineas and went away



1) So he pocketed five guineas and went away.

2) Mr. Brownlow said that he would gladly give the beadle treble the money if Mr. Bumble had any favourable information about the boy.

3) Mr. Bumble drew his chair to the fire and took the newspaper.

4) Mr. Bumble said that Oliver was a boy, born of low and vicious parents, that from his birth he displayed no better qualities than treachery, ingratitude, and malice.

5) The advertisement said that any person who had any information that would lead to the discovery of Oliver Twist or throw any light upon his previous history could get five guineas.

6) Mr. Bumble could give very different colouring to his little history, but it was too late to do it.

7) The very first paragraph, upon which Mr. Bumble's eye rested, was the advertisement.

8) In something more than five minutes Mr. Bumble was on his way to Pentonville.

3    Say whether the statement is true or false. If it is false, give the right variant.

1)After breakfast Mr. Brownlow sat down in the house at which the coach stopped, drew his chair to the fire and took the newspaper.

2) Mr. Bumble opened his eyes; read the advertisement, slowly and carefully, three times.

3) In something more than fifteen minutes Mr. Brownlow was on his way to Pentonville.

4) Mr. Bumble could give very different colouring to his little history, but it was too late to do it now.

5) When the old man came back to his place, Oliver was sitting up, impatiently awaiting his return.

4 Fill in prepositions: from, over, by, in, into, up, out, at, on, of.

1)Mr. Bumble arrived ______ London ______business.

2) Mr. Bumble said that Oliver ended his brief career ______ the place ______ his birth, ______ making an attack ______ the undertaker's apprentice, and running away ______ the night-time ______ his master's house.

3) It was a chill, damp, windy night when Fagin, pulling the collar ______ ______ his ears, went _____ _____ his den.

4) ______ length Fagin turned ______ a street, lighted only ______ a single lamp ______ the farther end.

Put the verbs, given in brackets, in the right tense form.

1)After dinner Mr. Bumble (sit) down in the house at which the coach (stop), (draw) his chair to the fire and (take) the newspaper.

2) Mr. Bumble (open) his eyes; (read) the advertisement, slowly and carefully, three times; and in something more than five minutes (be) on his way to Pentonville.

3) We have just (hear) a full account of him from his birth; and he has (be) a little villain, all his life.

4) You (be) a clever girl, my dear: the sharpest girl I've ever (see)!

5) I know what children (be), sir; and I have (do) these forty years.

Complete the sentences.

1) Inno more than five minutes Mr. Bumble was on his way to Mr. Brownlow because …

2) Mr. Brownlow called Oliver an imposter because …

3) Mrs. Bedwin didn't believe Oliver was an imposter because …

4) Mrs. Bedwin thought that Mr. Brownlow was wrong because …

5) Fagin pulled the collar up over his ears because …

What do you think?

1)Why do you think Mr. Brownlow sent his advertisement to the newspaper?

2) Why did Mr. Bumble read the advertisement three times?

3) Why do you think Mr. Bumble said such bad things about Oliver?

4) Why didn't Mr. Bumble get treble the money?

5) Why do you think Fagin decided to send Oliver to Bill Sikes?

 

CHAPTER 10

 

Oliver Is Delivered over to Mr. William Sikes

 

When Oliver awoke in the morning, he was very surprised to find a new pair of shoes with strong thick soles at his bedside. His old shoes were removed. When they sat down to breakfast, the old man told the boy that he was going to Bill Sikes that night. Oliver got very frightened.

'Don't be afraid, Oliver, you will come back to us again. Ha! Ha! Ha! We won't be so cruel as to send you away, my dear. Oh no, no! I suppose,' said Fagin, fixing his eyes on Oliver, 'you want to know what you're going to Bill's for — eh, my dear? Wait till Bill tells you, then.'

'Take care, Oliver!' said the old man, shaking his right hand before him in a warning manner. 'He's a rough man, and thinks nothing of blood when he gets angry. Whatever happens, say nothing; and do what he wants yоu to do!'

Fagin remained silent till night.

'You may burn a candle,' said Fagin, putting one upon the table. 'And here's a book for you to read, till they come to fetch you!'

For some minutes Oliver was lost in thought. Then, with a heavy sigh, he took up the book and began to read. It was a history of the lives and trials of great criminals. He read about dreadful crimes that made the blood run cold. The terrible descriptions were so real and vivid,that the pages seemed to turn red with blood.

The boy closed the book, and thrust it from him. Falling upon his knees, he prayed Heaven to spare him from such deeds.He still remained with his head buried in his hands, when he heard a rustling noise.

'What's that!' he cried, catching sight of a figure standing by the door. 'Who's there?'

'Me. Only me,' replied a tremulous voice.

Oliver raised the candle above his head: and looked towards the door. It was Nancy.

'Put down the light,' said the girl, turning away her head. 'It hurts my eyes.'

Oliver saw that she was very pale, and gently inquired if she was ill. The girl threw herself into a chair, with her back towards him.

'Has anything happened?' asked Oliver. 'Can I help you? I will if I can. I will, indeed.'

She rocked herself to and fro.

'Nancy!' cried Oliver, 'What is it?'

Drawing her chair close to the fire, she sat there, for a little time, without speaking; but at length she raised her head, and looked round.

'I don't know what comes over me sometimes,' said she, 'it's this damp dirty room, I think. Now, Oliver, dear, are you ready?'

'Am I to go with you?' asked Oliver.

'Yes. I have come from Bill,' replied the girl. 'You are to go with me.'

'What for?' asked Oliver.

'What for?' echoed the girl, raising her eyes at Oliver. 'Oh! For no harm.'

'I don't believe it,' said Oliver, who watched her closely.

'Have it your own way. For no good, then.' Nancy paused. 'I have saved you from being ill-usedonce, and I will again. I have promised that you will be quiet and silent; if you are not, you will only do harm to yourself and me too, and perhaps be my death. Remember this! And now give me your hand. Your hand!'

She caught the hand which Oliver instinctively placed in hers, and, blowing out the light, drew him after her up the stairs. The door was opened, quickly, by someone in the darkness, and was quickly closed, when they passed out.

A carriage was waiting for them. The girl pulled Oliver in with her. The driver wanted no directions, and they drove off in an instant.

Soon the carriage stopped. For one brief moment, Oliver cast a hurried glance along the empty street, and a cry for help hung upon his lips.But the girl's voice was in his ear. While he hesitated, the opportunity was gone; he was already in the house, and the door was shut.

'This way,' said the girl, releasing her hold for the first time. 'Bill!'

'Hallo, Nancy!' replied Sikes, appearing at the head of the stairs, with a candle.

'So you've got the kid,' said Sikes when they all reached the room, closing the door as he spoke.

'Yes, here he is,' replied Nancy.

'Did he come quiet?' inquired Sikes.

'Like a lamb,' rejoined Nancy.

'I'm glad to hear it,' said Sikes, looking grimly at Oliver. 'Come here and let me read you a lecture.'

Thus addressing his new pupil, Mr. Sikes pulled off Oliver's cap and threw it into a corner; and then, taking him by the shoulder, sat himself down by the table, and stood the boy in front of him.

'Now, first: do you know what this is?' inquired Sikes, taking up a pocket-pistol which lay on the table.

Oliver replied in the affirmative.

'Well, then, look here,' continued Sikes. 'This is powder; that here's a bullet,' and Bill Sikes loaded the pistol.

'Now it's loaded,' said Mr. Sikes.

'Yes, I see it is, sir,' replied Oliver.

'Well,' said the robber, grasping Oliver's wrist, and putting the barrel so close to his templethat they touched; 'if you speak a word when you're out of doors with me, except when I speak to you, that bullet will be in your head! So, if you make up your mind to speak, say your prayers first. Do you hear me? And now let's have some supper, and get a snoozebefore starting.'

It may be easily understood that Oliver had no great appetite that evening. He stretched himself in his clothes on a mattress upon the floor. For a long time Oliver lay awake, thinking that Nancy might whisper some further advice; but the girl sat brooding over the fire, without moving. Weary with watching and anxiety, he at length fell asleep.

When he awoke, the table was covered with tea-things, and Sikes was thrusting various articles into the pockets of his coat, which hung over the back of a chair. Nancy was preparing breakfast. It was not yet daylight;for the candle was still burning, and it was quite dark outside. A sharp rain, too, was beating against the window; and the sky looked black and cloudy.

After breakfast Bill Sikes exchanged a farewell with Nancy, took Oliver's hand and led him away. Oliver turned, for an instant, when they reached the door, in the hope of meeting a look from the girl. But she sat perfectly motionless before the fire and didn't look at the boy.

 

Helpful Words & Notes

vividadj — яркий, живой

he prayed Heaven to spare him from such deeds— он молил небо, чтобы оно избавило его от таких деяний

For no harm.— Не для плохого.

ill-use v — дурно обходиться (с кем-либо)

a cry for help hung upon his lips— крик о помощи замер у него на губах

templen — висок

get a snooze— вздремнуть

 

Activities

Answer the questions.

1)What did Oliver find in the morning?

2) What did the old man say to the boy when they sat down to breakfast?

3) What did Fagin give to Oliver in the evening?

4) What was the book about?

5) Who came in the evening?

6)What did Nancy say to Oliver?

7) How did they get to Bill Sikes?

8) What was Sikes's lecture about?

9) Why did Oliver lie awake for a long time?

10) When did Oliver awake?

11) What did Bill Sikes do after breakfast?


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